Cup Noodle Japan: 2.10.2013

Today was a fantastic day!

We left Keiichi’s home early, and took the train to Umeda (Osaka) station where we discovered the local Yoshinoya: breakfast was sorted. Yoshinoya is a travelers dream: great for people watching as well as cheap, quick and tasty food. I like how everyone seems to be eating there, from the young and hip, the fashionable, the punks, Goths and various sub-cultures, the businessmen, the elderly, male, female… Customers are greeted by a chorus of staff welcoming them, then orders are taken and almost instantly the food is served; people eat quickly and then leave. We take our time. It’s cheap, delicious and we can drink as much green tea and eat as much pickled ginger as we like. Winning.

After breakfast, we took the train from Umeda to Ikeda Station, not too far away, with the intention of visiting just the Momofuku Ando Cup Noodle Museum. Yep – a museum dedicated to instant cup noodles. It was an awesome place, and it was a lot of fun. We hired audio guides in English to explore the museum which gave us an insight into the background and invention of instant cup noodles, the inventor – Momofuku Ando – as well as their evolution up until today. Cup noodles in Japan are wildly different to the toxic crap on our supermarket shelves back home; they are “really good” as Keiichi explained to us, and often filled with a very wide selection of different dehydrated food items, noodles and stocks… Like children in a candy store, we were so excited and thrilled by this awesome museum – particularly the section of wall that showed every cup noodle flavour produced since invention.

After we’d seen enough of the museum, we bought a cup (300Y) and proceeded to make our own cup noodles, which was amazing fun! We got to decorate our cup before adding the noodles, choose flavors and toppings, sealing the lid, shrink wrapping the noodles and then putting the cup into a weird blow up necklace bag. This whole cup noodle making process took about an hour, mostly due to the fact that I was LOVING decorating our cup and couldn’t decide what colours to use…

After our super fantastic visit to the museum, we were wondering what we should do for the rest of the day… heading back towards the station, we came across a tourist information shop where we found a little “self-guided walking tour” map. It looked as though there were quite a few interesting sights to see in Ikeda, so we headed off down the main road following the suggested walking route – stopping by a 100Y shop on the way – of course.

The walking tour took us to visit little hidden shrines, gardens, cemeteries and temples. We visited famous Japanese sweet shops (where the sweets look more like an art work) but our tight budget meant we just looked, and didn’t buy. If the Indian touters taught us anything, it’s that “looking is free.”

Our little walking tour took us towards Ikeda Castle Gardens, where we spent a while just enjoying the beauty and serenity of the place. The castle had been re-constructed but was still pretty impressive; climbing the stairs and looking out over the balcony gave us a view of the entire gardens below us as well as a view over Osaka. Stunning.

Walking back along the road, I stopped to take a photograph of a beautiful building on the opposite side of the road. As I did so, a car came around the corner and the driver, seeing me taking a photograph, stopped so I could finish without her car getting in my way…
Oh Japan, so polite…

The little walking map kept us entertained for hours; after the castle, our next stop was an area famous for its historic buildings and homes, as well as beautiful sake brewries and more hidden temples and shrines. We spent a while just walking through the silent streets admiring the beautiful buildings and little gardens.

We spent some time strolling through a shopping street filled with little local shops selling various house hold goods and Japanese slippers and wooden shoes. Every second or third shop was a food stall or little eatery selling pickles, sushi and other various delights, or hidden away restaurants behind cloth curtains that always intrigued me… We found a shop front selling fresh, hand-made noodles, and the woman behind the counter smiled so politely and welcomed us through a small door. We’d made it into one of those hidden restaurants, and enjoyed amazing “Kitsune Udon” noodles for lunch, along with more beautiful green tea.

Our afternoon in Ikeda was spent strolling through the streets and looking at the cute shops. We found a little old lady selling beautiful cucumber maki, and chatted with a young Japanese guy for a bit who gave us more green tea.

In the late evening we took train back to Umeda station where we had dinner again at Yoshinoya. Yep – this place is definitely going to be part of our staple diet: 2 days in and we’ve already eaten it 3 times. Umeda station is massive and it wasn’t hard to spend a few hours just exploring the train station before we headed outside to discover a wealth of diverse street performers. We ended up spending more than an hour watching a Japanese boy band pump out some awesome music whilst a group of school girls went wild – squealing and swooning and putting on their most flirtatious giggles.

Oh Japan, you’re so awesome.

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